Kapcsolódó alrendszer

Smart Environment

Cedar Grove residential park

One of the largest residential complexes in Hungary was built in the city centre of Szeged from more than 7000 prefabricated elements and a total of 8510 m3 of concrete. The project in Huszár Street includes 593 apartments, offices and shops.

The six-hectare site, replacing the industrial character of the former cable factory and wholesale food site, will provide a green environment for its future residents in the city centre. Cedar Grove takes its name from the evergreen that grows there.

Promenade Plantée, Paris

One of the most famous examples of railroad reuse as a green space is the High Line (or High Line Park) in New York, which has been recognised as an icon of innovative design since its opening in 2009, and serves as a model for the reuse of abandoned infrastructure in other cities around the world. However, not everyone knows that the design of the High Line itself was based on another development, the Coulée verte René-Dumont (also known as the Promenade Plantée) in Paris, which opened in the early 1990s.

Landscaped drill-track in Berlin

In the centre of Kreuzberg, in the east of Berlin, is the landscape wound left behind by the railway, which until 2011 defined the district. Over the years, nature has started to take over the abandoned railway, which German urban development agency Atelier Loidl has taken the opportunity to transform into a diverse park forest, using the infrastructure elements left behind.  

Brownfield development of Merwede in Utrecht, aiming sustainability

Merwede is a neighbourhood in Utrecht, one of the fastest growing cities in the Netherlands. An old industrial area, it is now undergoing a transformation process based on urban planning criteria that puts clean and shared mobility ahead of the existing prioritisation of road traffic.The demolition works have begun in 2020 and the final project includes sustainable housing for around 12,000 people (the first residents are expected to move in by 2024). The new neighbourhood of Merwede will enable residents to access all the services on foot or using bicycles.

M4H harbour area transformation in Rotterdam

The municipality of Rotterdam and the Rotterdam Port Authority want to develop M4H (Merwe-Vierhavens, a 100 years old harbour area in the City of Rotterdam, a brownfield area with heavily polluted soil) into an innovative living-work environment, optimally equipped for innovative manufacturing industry and with a mix of working, residential, culture, catering, sports and education. An energetic district with an impact on both the city and the port.

In 2017, the municipality and the Port Authority formulated five objectives for M4H:

Empire Stores

This mixed-use development reimagines a vacant, 19th century warehouse on the DUMBO waterfront as a contemporary creative workplace and community hub. The conversion of this 42 000 m2 complex provides Brooklyn’s burgeoning Tech Triangle with much-needed office space, and brings retail, dining, public space, and exhibition galleries to the neighborhood.

Kán - the revival of an abandoned village

Kán is a settlement formed at the junction of the Mecsek and the Zselic, in a valley running north-south. The village is surrounded on all sides by woods, and is a one-street village, making it geographically isolated from traffic. The Swabian village dates back to the 12th century, but has been depopulated several times in its history. 
After the Second World War, following the German expulsions, the inhabitants left the village and in 1978 Kán ceased to exist as an independent municipality, and a year later it was annexed to the village of Hetvehely.