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Smart Living

High Line Park (New York)

As the project lead, James Corner Field Operations led the design and construction of the High Line - originally a 1.5-mile-long elevated rail structure on Manhattan’s West Side. Restored to the public as a "green corridor", the park's attraction is provided by its spectacular views of Manhattan and the Hudson River, as well as temporary exhibitions, outdoor installations and events.

Zadar sea organ

The town of Zadar, on the Dalmatian Adriatic coast, is known by its inhabitants as the "stone vessel", as it occupies a small elongated peninsula. In 2004, in view of the increasing tourist activity in Croatia, the Zadar Port Authority, with the support of the Municipality of Zadar, decided to renovate this stretch of the coast and turn it into a pier.

This task highlighted the need to create a promenade linking the town with the coast and the pier, the main attraction of it was the 72 m long sea organ integrated into the pavement.

The Red Ribbon Park

Against a background of natural terrain and vegetation, is a “red ribbon” spanning five hundred meters, which integrates the functions of lighting, seating, environmental interpretation, and orientation. While preserving as much of the natural river corridor as possible during the process of urbanization, this project demonstrates how a minimal design solution can achieve a dramatic improvement to the landscape.

Library Parks

During the 1990s, Medellín was globally perceived as one of the most dangerous and violent cities in the world. Since then, the city has transformed socially, economically, and culturally. Library Parks aim to address Medellín’s inequality.  Fundamentally,  the  facilities are designed  to  get people, particularly youth,  off the streets.

Denver Urbanism

DenverUrbanism provides news, ideas, and commentary about urbanism in Denver and advocates a progressive pro-urban agenda for the Mile High City. DenverUrbanism was launched in late 2010 as a companion blog to the DenverInfill website and blog created in 2004 by Ken Schroeppel, an urban planner who lives and works in Downtown Denver (see the Contributors page for Ken’s bio).

Exploring Dadaocheng using AR/VR

Taipei City Government co-worked with TAVAR and Chiang Wei-Shui Cultural Foundation to reproduce the scenery of 1920’s Taipei Dadaocheng district with virtual reality, augmented reality and other latest 3D experience technologies. The program gives audiences an understanding of Dadaocheng history. It uses innovative technologies to fuse with historical humanistic materials in order to allowing the audiences to approach and understand the contemporary background.

Playkers - Social Sports For Smart Cities

Playkers is a social sport-oriented platform that gives end-to-end management solutions for amateur sports players and field owners. With Playkers, municipalities can maximize their sports facilities' occupancy and engage with targeted sports communities. Players can manage a full cycle of game participation, including setting up games, locating games that are seeking players, and finding and inviting players.

Sustainable Sydney 2030

Sustainable Sydney 2030 is a set of goals we have set for our city to help make it as green, global and connected as possible by 2030. The plan will transform the way we live, work and play. Sydney 2030 came to life after we asked residents, visitors, workers and businesses what kind of city they wanted. People told us they wanted a city that cares about the environment, has a strong economy, supports the arts and that connects its people to each other and the rest of the world. Sydney 2030 is now the cornerstone of everything we do.

Kyoto Guide ENA

The Kyoto Guide ENA is an artificial intelligence-driven city guided chatbot. ENA uses local data to provide the correct travel information in and around Kyoto. ENA gets up-to-date information on local attractions, restaurants, shops, or traffic timetables. You can also display the data on the map.

Wild spaces for kids in Rotterdam

Voted the least attractive city to grow up in in 2006, Rotterdam has since spent €15m (£13.2m) on improvements to public spaces, housing and safe traffic routes in lower income neighbourhoods in an effort to build a child-friendly city. An open space in a city park forest has been converted into a nature playground – Natuurspeeltuin de Speeldernis – giving children the opportunity for unstructured play. Kids can enjoy the biodiversity of “wild” space, build dens, fires and rafts, and camp out. It now draws 35,000 visitors a year.